My Roof’s Shingles are Curling-What’s Up With That?

Filed under Roofing, www.lindusconstruction.com
Tagged as , , , , , ,

You’ve likely figured it out…curling shingles on your roof aren’t a good thing.  If this is occurring at your home, you’re probably wondering why it’s happening.  Allow us to explain likely reasons:

1) Inadequate Ventilation: A roof ventilation system works by pulling in outside air from intake vents placed on the lower part of the roof. The air that is taken in is displaced through higher parts of the roof. The result of inadequate venting is moisture and heat being trapped in your attic. Additional heat on the bottom side of shingles can cause them to wear prematurely, fade and curl.  It’s important to have proper ventilation which regulates the intake and outtake of air in your attic and keeps your shingles at an ideal temperature which will lessen the chance of them curling.

2) Improper Installation: Roofing manufacturers have strict regulations regarding how their roofs are installed. This can include things like number of nails per shingle, length of nail, etc.  Because of this, it’s strongly recommended that home owners work with a contractor familiar with the type of roof they are installing.  Failure to adhere to these specifications can cause your shingles to curl, not to mention, and void your warranty.  Installing shingles in the winter when they may have been stored at improper temperatures or installing them when they are wet, can also lead to curling.

3) Defective Products: As was the case in the CertainTeed Organic Shingle class action lawsuit, there are times when shingles can curl simply due to the fact that there carelessly manufactured.

4) Installing New Shingles over Old Ones: There’s several reasons (some of them legal) as to why installing a 2nd layer of shingles over a first layer.  Regardless of the statues in your area, it is improbable that the new shingles will line up with the existing ones. This will prevent the new shingles from sealing properly and as a result, they may come off during high winds easier than they normally would.  If they do not come off in high winds, the likelihood that they will still curl is high.

5) Shingle Has Reached the End of Its Lifecycle: While lifespans vary by material and roofing manufacturer, all shingles are similar in the fact that once they begin to curl, it’s time to start exploring new roofing options.

Lindus Construction offers both asphalt and metal roofing options. In 2011, they were named the #1 Roofer in the United States by GAF, which is North America’s largest manufacturer of residential and commercial roofing. Call us now at 1-800-873-1451 or check us out on the web at www.lindusconstruction.com to schedule a free in-home estimate today. Tune into AM 830 WCCO on Saturdays from 9:00-10:00am hosted by Denny Long and Andy Lindus to ask questions regarding your home improvement projects.

houzz

Comments are closed.