Category Archives: Water Conservation

Smart Water Consumption at Home

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Did you know that if all the water in the planet fit into a gallon jug, only 1 tablespoon (less than .5%) would be fresh water?  The U.S Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) states that the average American household with 4 occupants uses an average of 400 gallons per day, a majority of which is used indoors.  Smart water consumption saves you on energy bills and also makes for a more sustainable way of life. Below, we’ll offer some easy ways to conserve water without making major lifestyle changes.

Toilets: Your toilet can be responsible for as much as 27% of your home’s daily water consumption.  WaterSense toilets can reduce the amount of water used after each use but up to 80%.  Fix or replace a leaky toilet and conserve up to 200 gallons per day. 

Signs Your Toilet is Leaking:

-It won’t flush unless you hold the handle down to fully empty the tank

-Handle must be fidgeted with to get toilet to stop running

-Toilet makes sounds after being used

-Toilet runs for a long time after a flush

Not all leaks are obvious.  To test whether your toilet is leaking, flush and then remove the tank cover and add a teaspoon of food coloring.  DO NOT flush; wait an hour and then check your toilet bowl for food coloring.  If food coloring is found, it is a signal that a leak is present.  Consult with a reputable plumber about how to remedy the issue.

Faucets: Turn off the tap while you brush your teeth and save up to 200 gallons of water per month.  A faucet continuously dripping can often be fixed with something as simple as replacing a broken washer.  Eliminate the need to run the faucet until the water is cold enough to drink by keeping a pitcher of filtered water in your refrigerator.  Aerators control faucet water flow and screw into the faucet’s spout.  Switching to a low-flow aerator at the end of your faucets allows you to cut back on water usage.

Washing Machine:  Today’s high efficiency washing machines can use half the water that traditional models do.  Wait until you have a full load before you running your washing machine.  A cold load uses less energy than a hot one because the water does not have to be heated.

Shower Heads: Switch to low-flow shower heads to conserve water.

Dishwasher: A full load in the dishwasher will actually use less water than doing the same amount by hand.  Avoid running the dishwasher unless it is full.

Water Heaters: Unlike traditional water heaters, tankless models heat water as you use it.  Depending on the model you select, you can choose to supply only certain faucets or the entire home.

Rainwater Harvesters: Rainwater harvesting is collecting the run-off from a structure in order to store it for later use.  Rain collects in your gutter system that channels the waters flow into downspouts moving it into a storage vessel. There are many different types of rainwater harvesting systems and they range from systems that are as simple as a rain barrel or as detailed as large cisterns that can supply your entire household demand.  They allow you to be in control of your water supply and the collected water can be used in toilets, sprinkler systems, swimming pools and washing machines. It can also be used wash your car, pet, or water plants.

Sprinkler System: Double check to make sure your sprinkler system is watering your lawn and not your driveway or sidewalk.  Water in the morning or in the evening when water is less likely to evaporate quickly.  Avoid watering when it’s windy out because the water will not end up where you intend it to.  Mulch your landscaping to help it retain water.

 

Tune into AM 830 WCCO on Saturdays from 9:00-10:00am hosted by Denny Long and Andy Lindus to ask questions regarding your home improvement projects. Call us now at 1-800-873-1451 or check us out on the web at www.lindusconstruction.com to schedule a free in-home estimate.